Lisa Matthias

Foto Lisa Matthias

PhD Candidate

Research Interests

  • Political Communication
  • Frame Theory
  • Public Opinion & Polarization
  • Scholarly Communications
  • Open Access

Education

Since 10/2018

Doctoral Candidate, Graduate School of North American Studies, Freie Universität Berlin

2016

Master of Arts, North American Studies, John-F.-Kennedy Institut, Freie Universität Berlin

MA Thesis: “Judicial tyranny or American justice? How partisan news’ coverage of polarizing Supreme Court decisions differs in framing the nation’s highest court”

2015

Bachelor of Arts, English and American Studies, General History, Universität Potsdam

BA Thesis: “Capital punishment: Ambivalent positions in Truman Capote's In Cold Blood and Chuck Palahniuk's Lullaby.”

 

Invited Conferences & Talks

October 2019

"Assessing the impact of science, unscientifically,  Keynote Presentation, Open Science Event 2019, Mannheim, Germany                                                                                                                                   

June 2019

"Taking the Measure of Impact", Panel, Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences, Vancouver, Canada          

November 2018

"Digital Future: We are already there, but keep living in the past", Invited Talk, Postgraduate Forum of the German Association for American Studies, Essen, Germany                                                                                                                          

October 2017

“Aletheia – Technology & community for open knowledge sharing”
Poster Presentation, FORCE11 2017
Berlin, Germany

October 2017

“Utilizing Technology and Community Engagement for Open Knowledge Sharing”
Invited Talk, Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society
Berlin, Germany

September 2017

“We don’t want to call it a paradigm shift, but …”
Poster Presentation, Open Science Fair 2017
Athens, Greece

September 2017

Collaborative reading and continuous peer review with PaperHive: "keeping academic literature alive”
Invited Talk, Open Science Fair 2017
Athens, Greece

January 2017

“The art of getting cited”                                                                                                                Invited workshop, Chiang Mai University, Thailand

Scholarships & Awards

2019

Visiting Scholar, Scholarly Communications Lab, Simon Fraser University. February 15 - April 12. Vancouver, Canada.

2018

IGDORE Open Science Travel Award. 12 April – 3 May & 17 July – 16 September, Ubud, Indonesia.

2017

OpenCon Scholarship, OpenCon 2017. 11-13 November, Berlin, Germany.

2017

Young Investigator Travel Award, Sage Bionetworks Assembly 2017. 20-22 April, Seattle, WA, USA.

 

Politicians in Robes? Partisan Media Framing and Public Perception of the Supreme Court (Dissertationsprojekt)

Dissertation in Politik

Mentoring team:
First supervisor: Prof. Christian Lammert
Second supervisor: Prof. Dr. Curd Knüpfer
Third supervisor: Dr. Kathleen Searles

The U.S. Supreme Court is isolated from the public, yet dependent on high levels of public support to maintain its legitimacy. Due to this distance, the media functions as a mediator between the nation’s highest court and the public. While neutral reporting would present the Court as apolitical and preserve trust in the judiciary, portraying the Supreme Court as “just another political institution”, can harm its integrity and American democracy. My PhD project seeks to explore this complex relationship between the Supreme Court, partisan media, and the public. Partisan news outlets cater to audiences with distinct ideological beliefs, reinforcing them while opposing contrary beliefs. This can lead to partisan polarization, which has previously been exclusive to the political realm. However, recent polls have also revealed an existing party gap in the Supreme Court’s level of public support. As this implies a politicization of the Court, I am interested in how partisan media frame, or portray, the Supreme Court, how the framing has evolved over the last two decades, and if there is a visible pattern when looking at public opinion polls, in particular at the bipartisan divide, and the media’s framing of the Supreme Court. The second part of the project seeks to find out, through public surveys, how the media’s reporting influences public opinion of the Court.