Springe direkt zu Inhalt

Maximilian Klose

Picture1

Freie Universität

John F. Kennedy Institute

Gastwissenschaftler

Adresse
John-F.-Kennedy-Instiute
Lansstraße 7-9
Raum 214
14195 Berlin

Sprechstunde

Mondays between 3 and 4pm (room 214)

Professional Positions:

Since 04/2022: Guest Lecturer of North American History at FU Berlin (parental leave replacement)

10/2021-03/2022: Lecturer in North American History at FU Berlin

06/2021-12/2022: Postdoctoral Research at the Cluster of Excellence SCRIPTS – Contestations of the Liberal Script

06/2017-11/2017: Research Associate at JFKI, FU Berlin

Research project: “Power&Humanity – Contesting Notions of Human Rights and Humanitarianism in North America”

 

Education:

2021: PhD, Graduate School of North American Studies, FU Berlin

Dissertation Project: “Why They Gave: CARE, the U.S. Public, and Humanitarian Engagement for Germany after World War II” (Summa Cum Laude)

2017: Master of Arts, FU Berlin

North American Studies

2014: Bachelor of Arts, FU Berlin

History, English, North American Studies

 

Fellowships and Grants:

10/2017-05/2021: Dissertation Research Grant, German Research Foundation (DFG)

Summer 2020: Fellowship at the Joseph P. Horner Memorial Library of the German Society of Pennsylvania, German Historical Institute, Washington, D.C.

02/2019-05/2019: Short-term Doctoral Fellowship, German Historical Institute, Washington, D.C.

Summer Semester 2022

Undergraduate:

US Cultural Diplomacy in the 20th Century, Tuesdays, 14:00-16:00

Graduate:

Gender and Empire in the 18th and 19th Centuries: The US in Comparative Perspective, Tuesdays, 12:00-14:00

US Foreign Relations in the 19th Century, Mondays, 12:00-14:00


Winter Semester 2021/22:

Undergraduate:

Gender, Legitimacy, and Expansion in Antebellum America, Mondays 12:00-14:00


Winter Semester 2018/19

Undergraduate:

Humanitarian Aid and US Foreign Relations between WWI and the Cold War, Fridays, 12:00-14:00


Summer Semester 2017:

Undergraduate:

"We are to Hold Germany for Western Civilization." Political, Economic and Cultural Entanglements in the American Occupation of Germany, 1945-1949, Thursdays 10:00-12:00

  • 19th and 20th century U.S. foreign relations
  • History of humanitarian aid
  • Cold War transatlantic relations and cultural diplomacy
  • Gender and masculinity in the history of diplomacy and empire

My research focuses on the foreign relations of the United States in the 19th and 20th centuries. More specifically, it investigates the means and tactics various groups of U.S. actors employed to further their goals, to gain recognition for themselves or their causes, and to promote or change the course of U.S. diplomacy. My dissertation project analyzed the role of humanitarian aid in U.S. relations to post-WWII Germany, investigating how non-state actors used relief to make sense of their own and their country’s role in the new geopolitical situation of the Cold War. In my current project, I look at the ways in which discourses and practices of masculinity shaped the diplomatic relations between the United States, the German Empire, and the Empire of Japan from the mid-19th century until World War I.

Blog entry: “Ukrainian Refugees and the Limits of Liberal Humanitarianism”, https://www.scripts-berlin.eu/blog/Blog-47-Ukraine-No_10/index.html, March 28, 2022.

Book review of Möller, Esther et al. (eds). Gendering Global Humanitarianism in the Twentieth Century. Practice, Politics and the Power of Representation, HSozKult, September 27, 2021, https://www.hsozkult.de/review/id/reb-98275?title=e-moeller-u-a-hrsg-gendering-global-humanitarianisms&recno=8&q=&sort=&fq=&total=18227.

“Auf halbem Weg zur Weltmacht: Die Rolle der Vereinigten Staaten im Ersten Weltkrieg“, Politik & Kultur 2/2018: 22.